Below is information about the last date, November 21st, in our virtual event.

All sessions in this schedule subject to change.

(Times for this event are provided in both EST and PST.)

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21st

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM PST

11:00 AM - 11:45 AM EST

Self Care Morning Session

NETWORKING SESSION (ALL CONFERENCE EVENT)

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

No CEs will be awarded for this session.

 


9:00 AM - 12:00 PM PST

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM EST


Annual Membership Meeting Awards and RDT/BCT

Announcements

MEMBERSHIP MEETING (ALL CONFERENCE EVENT)

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

No CEs will be awarded for this session.

12:00 PM - 12:15 PM PST

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM EST

 15 MINUTE BREAK
 

12:15 PM - 1:45 PM PST

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM EST

(Concurrent Sessions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

BCT Meeting

MEETING

ABSTRACT

The BCT meeting is an opportunity to fulfill a mandatory requirement set by the NADTA for BCT membership. It also provides a time to meet and share concerns around topics of education and training for AT and university settings. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. To fulfill BCT requirements

  2. To share concerns and updates to the Board on topics of education

  3. To come together as a community and to share resources

PRESENTER/FACILITATOR

Mimi Savage, PhD RDT/BCT,  NADTA Education Chair

THIS MEETNG IS REQUIRED FOR ALL BCTs.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

No CEs will be awarded for this session.

Government Affairs Meeting

WORKSHOP/FORUM

PRESENTERS

 NADTA Government Affairs Committee

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT 

1.5 hrs. RDT

FREE PLAY - NYU Collideoscope Repertory Theatre Company (CRTC)

PERFORMANCE

DESCRIPTION

Located in the NYU Program in Drama Therapy’s Theatre & Health Lab, the Collideoscope Repertory Theatre Company (CRTC) was founded in 2020 with a mission to advance racial justice and healing through performance. With this mission in mind, the CRTC features playwrights who identify as Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) whose work illuminates sources of suffering, joy, and possibility. The CRTC convenes a multigenerational, international affinity group for BIPOC drama therapy students, professionals, and allied artists to deepen relationships and a sense of belonging while grappling with the complexities of solidarity. The CRTC leverages the benefits of virtual performance to convene spaces where we can attend to the intersectional impact of white supremacy on our personal and collective wellbeing while supporting sustainable coalition building across lines of difference with attention to the dynamics of settler-colonialism that risk erasing and replacing Indigenous realities. The inaugural performance, Idris Goodwin's FREE PLAY, a collection of five short plays, locates Black lives and embodies Black stories that span over many generations, from young children to beloved elders in performance. Goodwin’s work speaks directly to contemporary Black narratives.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Participants will understand the benefits of therapeutic theatre as a modality to foster community and affinity for marginalized identities, more specifically BIPOC clinicians and allied professionals.

  2. Through performance, the audience will learn about the experiences of Black Americans including but not limited to historical and generational trauma, police brutality, and the necessity of the Black Lives Matter movement.

  3. Participants would be able to reflect on the effects of intercultural conflicts on interpersonal relationships.

PRESENTERS

 Adam Stevens, MA, RDT, is a joyous Black, gender creative individual. They are a Registered Drama Therapist (RDT) who works at the Cooke School & Institute guiding young people with developmental differences. They are the Artistic Director of the Collideoscope Repertory Theatre Company (CRTC) in the NYU Program in Drama Therapy. They serve as an adjunct faculty member in the Drama Therapy Programs at Antioch University in Seattle and Marymount Manhattan College in NYC. They sit on the Board of Directors for the North American Drama Therapy Association (NADTA) as Chair of the Cultural Humility, Equity, and Diversity Committee. Through his clinical artistry, Adam looks to center the voices and experiences of marginalized folx.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

1.5 hrs RDT*

*This offering is eligible for RDT CE hours toward the CHED-content area.

A Failed Therapist: A Mockumentary on Myths & Misconceptions About Therapists & Therapy Within the Indian Context

PERFORMANCE

DESCRIPTION 

“Art recreates the creative principle of created things” (Boal, 1985)From web series to social media, screens are currently flooded with “mental health” content. A rising concern for practicing therapists is misinformation, mal-practice and misguided spaces that endanger client’s safety due to therapists being insufficiently trained or functioning without supervision or therapy for self. Additionally, “individuals experiencing poverty, mental illness, or chronic disease are hampered by the bond that media has with capitalism.” (Cubitt, 1993)With a higher prevalence of clients reporting violations in their therapeutic alliance, there is an increased need to reaffirm the safety of therapeutic boundaries to hold and support client’s needs. “Video is an art material with a rich history of storytelling, activism and documentation. Yet it also has a history as a public medium in which popular opinions, stereotypes, and mono-cultural perspectives have often been presented” (Mosinski, 2014)”Taking inspiration from Sacha Baron Cohen’s Who is America? And Borat, Zach Galifianakiss “Between the Ferns” and Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed, comes a mixed-method performance research that hopes to highlight the need for advocacy for mental healthcare. In this semi-fictional mockumentary, we journey with the naively unethical, culturally insensitive, unsupervised, unboundaried healer who wants to be therapist, Vimi Kapoor(played by drama-therapist Anupriya M. Banerjee Puthran) as she speaks to the masses and mental health professionals of India on what it means to be a therapist and in therapy in this day and age.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. How can performance and humour support challenging conversations related to mental health advocacy in the Indian and global context? By utilizing the roles of Joker and Spect-actor, the researcher finds a neutral, humorous play space in performance to work with the resistance towards mental healthcare. “The term Joker is in reference to its neutral role in a deck of cards but also references the trickster who disrupts and reveals the complexities present in the embodied and/or staged processes… The spect-actor is a term Boal developed to counter the passive receptivity associated with the traditional division of theatre… Boal transgresses this divide and reminds his participants and audience members to act upon oppression rather than only observe it”(Sajnani, 2009)Participants will be able to indicate the importance and relevance of using performance and humour in navigating the delicate and difficult conversations surrounding ethics and culture.

  2. Channeling ethical anger - Borrowing from Moreno’s understanding of ethical anger (1986); a reflexive concept that points to many sources and forms that anger can take on, and how it can support both catharsis of integration and abreaction, (Garcia & Buchanan, 2009). Moreno (1986) further states: “There are those who can deny us the right not only to speak out, but even the right to carry ethical anger when others are being denied privileges or rights that we deem to be the lot of all… Indicating how ethical anger is able to resist the corrosion of our value system” “Reality was and is in transition” (Boal, 1985, p 168) and as a therapist, it is a function of our role to empathically meet the resistance in our realities and support healthier transitions. The surplus reality or liminal space created by the researcher allows for the dysfunctionality to merge as well as action-oriented insight on how misattunement can teach us to build our attunement and congruence. The current situation of ethics in the country in many ways mirrors the dysfunctional family as encapsulated by Howell (1979):“When there is a conflict within the family, family members try to figure who is right or who is wrong. The harder they try to prove the rightness or wrongness, the more the conflict accelerates. Very few people have been trained to become aware of this process. One way to understand the use of conflict or the attempt to prove right and wrong is to see it as a way of defining process and how people position themselves in relation to the other. One of the most helpful procedures of working with families in therapy is to stay tuned into the process and not get caught up in the content that people present.” Participants will see contextualized case examples of therapists actively working with resistance and functioning within indigenous frameworks that echo themes of oppression, colonization and insufficient awareness.

  3. How does the avatar of “failed therapist” help? Much like a mask created and played with in the therapeutic process, the role of the “failed therapist” by itself has many aspects that inform the research and performance process:1. Cultural relevance: In a god-fearing country like India, many mental health professionals, untrained in holding boundaries in praxis, tend to adorn a god-like exertion of power and control on a client already feeling vulnerable as they come into the therapeutic encounter. With growing trends of online certifications, unsupervised training programs and lack of legalized licensure for practice, the frequency of malpractice is higher. The “failed therapist” is an inspired incarnation of real stories and people born out of the current tapestry of Indian experiences2. Relatability: Due to the high prevalence of mal-practice, therapy is commonly associated with the misconceived notions of intrusive, unsafe spaces that can solve life problems. Popular Indian culture references would include The Family Man, Masaba Masaba and more global examples would include Brooklyn Nine Nine that showcase moments where therapists cross boundaries and endanger their clients. The heightened sense of relatability to the situation offers a pathway to perspectives that concretize or create safer spaces.3. Aesthetic Distance (Landy, 1993, 1994, 1996, 2007): The persona of “failed therapist” offering the aesthetic distance needed to engage with the discomforting elements of ethical anger (Moreno, 1986) in the body of the researcher.

PRESENTERS

Anupriya Banerjee, , is Founder and Creative Director of Doctor Drama and Assistant Course Coordinator for the P.G. Diploma Program in Expressive Arts Therapy at St. Xavier’s (Autonomous) College, Mumbai, Ms. Anupriya M. Banerjee has explored the landscape of theatre, dance, films, media, and therapy. She is the first Indian to graduate from the Master’s Program in Drama Therapy, New York University (2016). She also holds a Diploma in Journalism from NDTV Media Institute (2014) and Performing Arts. She employs techniques of performing and expressive arts with individuals in recovery across ages and abilities. In New York, she worked closely with treatment for differential diagnosis at Lenox Hill Hospital and Kings County Hospital. She was appointed as the Creative Arts Therapist In-charge of the acute in-patient psychiatric ward at Brookdale Hospital. Post her return to India, Miss Banerjee started an online portal called Doctor Drama (2017), aimed at making self-care via dramatherapy accessible and comprehensible for people across the world. The portal offers DIY self-care videos, psycho-educational short films, therapeutic theatre projects and documentaries (directed by Ms.Banerjee as well) relating to the expressive arts therapy movement in India. Along with offering private drama therapy tele-health sessions, she has facilitated multiple wellness workshops for spaces like Public Health Office (Maharashtra State Board), Manipal University, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, International Autism Conference, Hindustan Petroleum, Swiggy, Youth for Mental Health and Swami Vivekananda Education Society. Anupriya was invited by Tedx ICT (Institute of Chemical Technology),Mumbai to speak on Drama therapy and self-care (2018) and was nominated as a “The Chetna Hero” for her work as Doctor Drama. She identifies as a trauma-informed, intersectional feminist therapist and mental health advocate. She is a core founding member of Drama-Therapy India, and represents the same at the World Alliance of Dramatherapy.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

1.5 RDT*

*This offering is eligible for RDT CE hours toward the CHED-content area.

 

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM PST
4:45 PM - 5:15 PM EST

30 MINUTE BREAK 

2:15 PM - 3:45 PM PST

5:15 PM - 6:45 PM EST

(Concurrent Sessions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethics Plenary

WORKSHOP/FORUM 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1. Understand role of the Ethics Committee and its relationship to the NADTA Community

2. Identify current and future issues of ethical concern to the community

3. Identify some specific ethical issues specific to teletherapy and technology within drama therapy

4. Relate general ethical concerns and principles to specific practice contexts

PRESENTERS

Adam Reynolds, NADTA Ethics Chair and Members of the Standards and Ethics Committee

CONTINUNING EDUCATION CREDIT

 1.5 hrs RDT, LCAT, NBCC

Drama Therapy Review: Spotlight on Special Issues

WORKSHOP/FORUM

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Participants will become more familiar with three areas of emerging research in drama therapy: older adults, racial justice and decolonizing approaches, and incarcerated, criminalized and justice-involved populations. 

  2. Participants will gain knowledge about possible clinical and practice applications of this emerging research. 

  3. Participants will become more familiar with the research publishing process and how to receive support in publishing an article.

PRESENTERS

Nisha Sajnani, Ph.D., RDT-BCT, [email protected] , is the Director of the Drama Therapy Program and Theatre & Health Lab at New York University. She is also on faculty with the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma and editor of Drama Therapy Review. Dr. Sajnani is the recipient of the Corann Okorodudu Global Women's Advocacy Award from the American Psychological Association, the Gertrud Schattner Award from the North American Drama Therapy Association, and the first Diversity award from the American Society for Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama. She founded Arts & Health @ NYU and chairs the NYU Creative Arts Therapies Consortium and International Research Alliance, a collaborating center with the World Health Organization Arts in Health Program.

 

Christine Mayor, PhD Candidate, MA, RP, RDT/BCT, [email protected],  is the founding Associate Editor of Drama Therapy Review. She is a PhD Candidate at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario where she studies the ways in which popular trauma-engaged school work may reinforce whiteness and anti-Blackness. Her practice experience focuses on social justice- and trauma-centered drama therapy using Developmental Transformations and Theatre of the Oppressed. She is also an active member of the Walls to Bridges (W2B) Collective at the Grand Valley Institute for Women, where she collaborates with incarcerated women in challenging colonial educational barriers through an innovative model that incorporates lived experience, circle pedagogy, and creative approaches.

Angelle Cook, Ph.D., RDT/BCT, [email protected],  is an associate professor at Lesley University and an adjunct at NYU and Antioch University. She runs a private practice where she works with teens and adults at the intersections of dis/ability, chronic illness, and mental illness. She is the Managing Editor for the Drama Therapy Review and is part of the NADTA’s Research Committee.

Kamran Afary, PhD, RDT, [email protected]is an assistant professor of communication studies at Cal State LA, and an adjunct instructor at the Drama Therapy Institute of Los Angeles. He is the recipient of the 2020 Raymond Jacobs Memorial Diversity Award from NADTA. He is the author of Performance and Activism: Grassroots Discourse After the Los Angeles Rebellion of 1992 (2009); an editor of and contributor to Communication Research on Expressive Arts & Narrative as Forms of Healing (2020); coauthor of a chapter with Pam Dunne on “Narradrama” in the 3rd edition of Approaches in Drama Therapy (2020); also coauthor of the book Iranian Diaspora Identities: Stories and Songs (2020); coauthor of “Mollā Nasreddin and the Creative Cauldron of Transcaucasia” (2019) in the British Journal of Middle East Studies. Since 2017 he has taught Health Communication, Performance, and Interpersonal Communication courses to incarcerated students at Lancaster Prison.

Andrew M. Gaines, PhD, LCAT, RDT-BCT, [email protected], is the Head of Theatre Arts/Communication at Grays Harbor College and previously taught drama therapy, and educational/applied theatre at New York University and Pratt Institute. His research centers on the power of performance for healing, activism, and human development in marginalized communities. He recently published Therapeutic Teaching Artistry: Towards a Wellness Model for Enhancing Vitality in Older Adults in the Drama Therapy Review special issue on older adults for which he served as Guest Co-Editor. Dr. Gaines co-authored The History, Trends, and Future of Drama Therapy in North America chapter with Jason Butler in the International Handbook of Dramatherapy. His next publication addresses clinical applications of rasaboxes in drama therapy. Andrew was the recipient of the NADTA Performance Award for Kindergarten Truck, his mobile, immersive, community-engaged, drama therapy-inspired production that toured nationwide in 2015.

Refiloe Lepere, PhD, [email protected], is a black feminist playwright, theatre director, drama therapist, journalist and facilitator. Her areas of research are participatory art, postcolonial and feminist theories in drama therapy, and artistic activism. She is also a lecturer at the Tshwane University of Technology, in South Africa. Her work is a journey in various media; radio, video, performance, and social practice. She weaves history, statistics and personal narratives to address issues of social (in) justice, intersectional identities and black experiences. Her research looks at how race and gender perform and thereby frame and shape our understanding and interpretation of the world. She is concerned with the marginalization of black women and reframes their experience as central to a radical world. She creates dialogues between race and feminist theory, social justice and theatre-making practice, drama therapy and human rights. She is a graduate of the program in Drama Therapy at New York University and completed her PhD with the University of Witwatersrand. She is a NIHSS SAHUDA Fellow, a Think Fellow and Ford Foundation Fellow.

Elizabeth Malone Alteet, MFA, RDT, [email protected], is a Drama Therapist and Teaching Artist working with people impacted by incarceration. Her past work includes directing and devising original theater in men's prisons and jails, improvisational and expressive arts workshops with women in jail, as an instructor for inmate education at Santiago Canyon College, and facilitating groups for children with incarcerated family members. She is currently leading drama therapy workshops with youth in juvenile hall with Project Kinship. She received her BFA from NYU, MFA from Columbia, and her drama therapy training from The Drama Therapy Institute of Los Angeles.

Jennie Smith-Peers, MA, CFRE, [email protected], is a primary caregiver to her mother, and a passionate advocate for older adults. Currently, she is an MBA candidate at the University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business, where she is focusing on healthcare management.  Her previous work included leading the National Center for Creative Aging, the only advocacy organization that was dedicated to arts and aging, and prior to that Jennie served as Executive Director of Elders Share the Arts, a pioneering arts and aging organization headquartered in Brooklyn, NY. Under her leadership, ESTA became an active advocate for older adults within New York City’s cultural field, and developed an innovative cross-sector training program with the State Office on Aging and the Arts of Pennsylvania. 

Britton Williams, LCAT, RDT, [email protected], is a Black woman. Drama Therapist. A myriad of hyphens and ands. She is a teacher and student. A thinker and dreamer. She is urgently concerned with the possibilities that live with/in radical (re)imagining and the inextricable connectedness of healing and liberation. And…

Akhila Khanna, MA Candidate, [email protected]is a first year graduate student in the Drama Therapy program at NYU, research assistant of the Theatre and Health Lab and communications lead for the Drama Therapy Review journal. Akhila’s practice — which sheblogsabout madly— stems from her training in the Theatre of the Oppressed (TO) methodology, Bharatynatyam classical dance and her love for playing games with communities across cultures in the U.S and India.

 

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

 1.5 hrs RDT

Dropping the Star

PERFORMANCE

DESCRIPTION

An Albanian woman defies the Communist system to find liberation and meaning in embracing an empowered life. This Autobiographical Therapeutic Performance follows her intimate journey through the traumas of patriarchal oppression, sexual abuse and reclaiming abandoned parts of her Self. A Shero's journey from voicelessness to finding and claiming her singing voice. From Albania's Communist regime and the systemic oppression, the rigid boundaries of the familial patriarchal system stifle the free expression of her spirit. Violence, sexual trauma and healing come through finding resilience in the most unexpected forms. This performance is the result of a 1 year therapeutic engagement to heal personal, historical and collective trauma.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Participants will be able to explain how Autobiographical Therapeutic Performance can transform a dysfunctional personal narrative when working with trauma.

  2. Participants will be able to describe how Autobiographical Therapeutic Performance can be an effective form of short term therapy.

  3. Participants will be able to articulate how the ATP can be a corrective experience that helps alleviate self limiting beliefs.

PRESENTERS

Ornela Kapetani, MA, RDT, CCTP, is a drama therapist and a professional actress. In 2009 she graduated with a MA from Central School of Speech and Drama, in Drama and Movement Therapy (Sesame approach). Since then she has worked within numerous establishments, such as schools, community centres, mental health hospitals, and NGO's. She has her private practice and works with people who have been impacted by trauma.

Armand Volkas, MLF, RDT-BCT, is a psychotherapist, drama therapist and theatre director. He is a Board Certified Trainer in this discipline with The North American Drama Therapy Association. Armand is Clinical Director of the Living Arts Counseling Center in Berkeley, California. In addition, he is Associate Professor in the Counseling Psychology Program at California Institute of Integral Studies and has been Adjunct Professor at John F. Kennedy University, the Summer Peacebuilding Institute and the Canadian School of Peacebuilding. He has developed innovative programs using drama therapy for social change, intercultural conflict transformation, intercultural communication, peacebuilding and healing historical and collective trauma. Armand has been honored by the NADTA with the Raymond Jacobs Award for his dedication to diversity and cultural competence and The Gertrud Schattner Award from the North American Drama Therapy Association for his distinguished contributions to the field.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

1.5 hrs RDT*, NBCC

*This offering is eligible for RDT CE hours toward the CHED-content area.

 

Finding Emilou: A Relationship-Centered Care Case Study in Concert

PERFORMANCE

DESCRIPTION

In a unique case study format using original song, narrative, and puppetry, Kareen King, Registered Drama Therapist takes the observers on an intimate journey toward finding Emilou, an individual with dementia who was considered by some to be the stereotypical “nursing home shouter.” Though she received excellent nursing care at the skilled nursing facility where she lived, her emotional needs were difficult to meet and often ignored. Her repeated cries for help were so common that it was easy for caregivers to become desensitized to them on occasion. This performance illustrates moments when someone was needed to fill in the gaps, to take a second look, to provide a listening ear. Participants leave with a greater propensity toward empathy and being fully present with someone, regardless of age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or physical or cognitive ability. Emilou’s story also demonstrates exceptions to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, where love and belonging are foundational. Kareen King, founder of The Golden Experience, is a Keynote Speaker, Creative Engagement Specialist, Recording Artist, and author of Engage! 28 Creative Enrichment Experiences for Older Adults, (ArtAge Publications). Her CDs have been used as a resource for staff training with a focus on relationship-centered care and communication with individuals with dementia. Kareen works with organizations that want to create a culture where older adults and their care partners are loved, validated, and creatively engaged. Kareen can be contacted at kkingthegoldenexperience.com or visit her website at www.thegoldenexperience.com.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. The learner will be able to engage in an I-Thou, rather than an I-It, relationship, a concept originated by Jewish philosopher, Martin Buber. 

  2. The learner will be able to recognize and address the significance of exceptions to the order in Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

  3. The learner will be able to operate and animate a puppet in a way that lovingly and playfully engages clients.

PRESENTERS

Kareen King, RDT, founder of The Golden Experience, works with organizations that want to create a culture where elders and their care partners feel loved, validated, and creatively engaged. She is a Keynote Speaker, Registered Drama Therapist, Creative Engagement Specialist, Certified Dementia Care Specialist, Recording Artist, and author of Engage! 28 Creative Enrichment Experiences for Older Adults (ArtAge Publications). She has recorded two CDs, The Person in the Picture Ain’t Me and Find Me, of original music that give voice to elders with and without dementia. Her book and CD’s have been used as a training resource for caregivers around the world. She currently creates and facilitates creative engagement programs weekly for older adults at two retirement communities in Kansas. This includes programs for Assisted Living Residents, Skilled Nursing Residents, and residents in Memory Care. She and her husband Jeff are the parents of five adult children and live in Lawrence, Kansas. For more information, visit www.thegoldenexperience.com.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

1.5 hrs RDT*, NBCC, LCAT

*This offering is eligible for RDT CE hours toward the CHED-content area.

 

4:00 PM - 6:00 PM PST

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM EST

Poster Sessions

WORKSHOP/FORUM (ALL CONFERENCE EVENT)

PRESENTERS

Agathe de Broucker & Opher Shamir - NADTA Poster Curators

For more information, click here to review the poster abstracts:

 

 

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT  

CEs: 2 hrs RDT*

*This offering is eligible for RDT CE hours toward the CHED-content area.

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POST CONFERENCE DAYS EVENTS:

Monday, December 6th, 2021 (subject to change)

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM PST 

8:00 PM - 9:00 PM EST

 

NADTA Student Forum III & 2021-2023 Board Meet & Greet

MEETING (ALL CONFERENCE EVENT)

LEAD PRESENTERS 

Student Committee Chairs

 Amanda Rothman (she/her), MA, is a recent graduate of the Drama Therapy Master’s Program at NYU. She was a clinical intern for Behavioral Health Services at NYC Health + Hospitals/Kings County as well as The Center for Community Counseling and Wellbeing. She is the co-creator and co-facilitator of the H.E.R.O. Unmasking Workshop, a virtual drama therapy series for healthcare workers on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. Amanda is a member of the Research Measurements Updating Sub-committee of the NADTA and is the Co-Chair of the NADTA Student Committee.

Elena Offerman (she/her), MA, is a recent graduate of the Drama Therapy Master’s Program at NYU. She was a clinical intern for Behavioral Health Services at NYC Health + Hospitals/Kings County, a clinical counseling intern for Hetrick-Martin Institute, and the drama therapy intern for the NYU Steinhardt Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic. She is the co-creator and co-facilitator of the H.E.R.O. Unmasking workshop, a virtual drama therapy series for healthcare workers on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. She is the Co-Chair of the NADTA Student Committee

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT

No CEs will be awarded for this session.

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